Week 142: Know Your Copyrights

Wikipedia is freely licensed, but that doesn't mean there are no copyrights at all. Rather, as the "Copyrights" policy explains, all content is considered to be copyrighted by its contributors and "formally licensed to the public under one or several liberal licenses" (usually, but not always, Creative Commons). 

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Week 141: Tea House, Su Casa

The "Teahouse" is a space dedicated to helping new Wikipedia editors, where visitors can ask questions and meet other community members. It contains many helpful links to various resources, and is populated by a number of helpful editors.

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Week 140: Wikipedia's Excellent Adventure

Wikipedia editing can be far from intuitive, and sometimes even intimidating. In addition to learning its markup language or its Visual Editor, there seems to be endless catalog of policies and guidelines that may make newcomers think twice before getting started. The Wikipedia Adventure changes that.

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Week 139: Dude, That's So Meta

Meta-Wiki, located at meta.wikimedia.org, is billed as "the global community site for the Wikimedia projects and the Wikimedia movement in general". As you may recall, "Wikimedia" is the larger name given to the Wikipedia and its sister projects as a collective whole, administered by the Wikimedia Foundation.

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Week 138: Style Points

In the two years since WP:60 launched, we have delved into many important points from Wikipedia's Manual of Style (MOS). But the main Manual of Style is not Wikipedia's only guidebook. Additional Wikipedia style guides go even deeper, covering specific sections of articles, article topic areas, and how to resolve discrepancies between style guides.

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Week 137: The Overlink Hotel

Wikipedia's articles are interconnected through those blue links that lead you to other encyclopedia: wikilinks. This is how you get from a villainous pro wrestling group to Philosophy in 11 clicks of a mouse. 

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Week 136: Title Tattle

Wikipedia's Manual of Style has specific rules about using titles of people. Generally, titles and
positions such as "president" or "king" are common nouns and should appear in lowercase. 

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Week 135: Entitlement Program

Wikipedia's Manual of Style has specific requirements for titles of works: major works like novels and films should be italicized, while minor works like songs and poems should be in "quotation marks". But some titles require neither italics nor quotation marks, including scripture, constitutional documents, commercial products, and large-scale events.

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Week 134: Extra Levels

In recent weeks, we've discussed user access levels, in particular reviewing and rollback rights. This week, we'll briefly mention five more:

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Week 133: Rollback to the Future

Reviewing rights permit users to decide if specific edits are generally appropriate for Wikipedia (but they are not responsible for deciding the changes are "correct"). Reviewers help reduce vandalism and other inappropriate edits, such as copyright violations, made by anonymous contributors

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